Transforming Suffering Lesson Four CE Professional Group Learning Guide

Transforming Suffering Series

CE Professional Group Track Learning Guide

Lesson Four: Relatedness

Directions:

-The first step is ACT ONE. This interactive form section will give you an opportunity to delve deeply into the concepts behind our lesson and reflect on how they connect to your life and your role as caregiver. A critical element for the success of an ACT Learning Group is to provide some time and space for personal reflection and journaling.

-After completing this step, ACT TWO is a period of group discussion and reflection. All participants must be given a safe space to express themselves during this time. This portion of the interactive form is filled out with insights gained from your community exploration.

-Next, your group will move on to ACT THREE, the Best Practicesreal-world habits, ways of thinking, or behaving that can increase personal well-being. Goals to incorporate best practice suggestions can be made on the group or individual level and support systems can be developed during this time.

ACT Step One: Individual Reflection

Completed forms may be printed out by pressing CTRL button + P (Windows) or CMD button + P (Mac).

By submitting this form you are agreeing to contribute to our national research project. All information will be used anonymously.

ACT Step Two: Group Discussion

1. "The most beautiful people we have known are those who have experienced defeat, suffering, struggle and loss and have found their way out of those depths." —Elisabeth Kübler Ross

2.“Vast amounts of biomedical research now indicate that our feelings, beliefs, attitudes, spiritual life, and physical well-being are closely intertwined. In addition, researchers have found complex links between the body and the mind and have established a common language between organs and emotional responses.” – (Exploring the Mind-Body Connection: Therapeutic Practices and Techniques, 2013)

3.“As Hippocrates once wrote, ‘The natural healing force within each one of us is the greatest force in getting well.’ This is mind-body medicine in a nutshell. . . .  Mind-body techniques can be helpful for many conditions because they encourage relaxation, improve coping skills, reduce tension and pain, and lessen the need for medication.” – University of Maryland Medical Center (article available on the web material additional resource page)

4. “It is who and what we are in relationship to that support our wellbeing as much as any drug or therapy.”   —Richard Groves

Completed forms may be printed out by pressing CTRL button + P (Windows) or CMD button + P (Mac).

By submitting this form you are agreeing to contribute to our national research project. All information will be used anonymously.

ACT Step Three: Best Practices – (Choose at Least One)

Required Lesson Materials: Spiritual Assessment Form

1. “It is who or what we are in relationship to that supports well-being or creates suffering… ”- Soul & Science Lesson

Take special note of the “relatedness” section of the Spiritual Health Assessment Form you are filling out on a daily or weekly basis. Observe your own level of relatedness or personal connections. Notice what factors and patterns are influencing this important dimension of your own well-being. Record your observations in the margins of your spiritual assessment form or write about them in your journal.

2. “The brain is improved by exercise…”- Soul & Science Lesson

Watch the following on-line video regarding Dr. John Ratey’s research and challenge yourself to take a ten minute (minimum) mindless walk each day:

http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2014/05/19/why-walking-matters

Record your state of mind before and after the exercise.  How might you translate this practice for those who are in your care?

3.  “The most beautiful people we have known are those who have experienced defeat, suffering, struggle and loss and have found their way out of those depths.” – Soul & Science Lesson

Write one or two of those down and the record what you gained from that experience, whether it was knowledge, experience, change in direction, etc. Look at your relationship with that struggle and acknowledge its strengthening qualities. Think about current difficult situations and allow the possibility of positive results from negative experiences.

Closing Thought

“Think of all the beauty still left around you and be happy.”
—from the Diary of Anne Frank

Additional Resources